Graphics traces

2014

Graphics Traces is a site specific performance and installation that examines the relationship between drawing and dance: from the live to the mediated act, from the screen to the dancer in the space, from the dancer movement to the drawn mark. ‘Via a performance incorporating live dance, drawing, sound and video projections, Emanuele’s performance explored dance as a form of notation, tasking a dancer with creating certain formation and pattern of marks by the end of the performance and seeing how this affected the dance and gestures that then occurred’ (review by Sarah McLean)

Graphics Traces was realized for acts reacts 2014, a festival of performance across theatre and fine art at Wimbledon Space with the participation of dancer Lauren Bridle from The People Pile.

Acts Re-acts 1 Exhibition 

Melting series

2005

Breaking down the line

Sketchbook Series 1 to 100: page 4, 11, 43, 37, 12, 3…

2016

Translating choreographic movements into paper constructions, temporarily balanced, Sketchbook series 1 to 100 animates the blank pages of a sketchbook as fleeting momentary sculptures of a dancer’s movements. A sort of taxonomy of a series of gesture, a rhetoric of movements, which becomes a series of stills of the same action: folding paper.

Immateriality: Possibilities and Experiences Exhibition

 

 

Two but not two

2008

In two but not two Emanuele continues her exploration of the fluidity of the boundaries between inner & outer realms of a subject . What interests her has to do with being a subject, living in both a private /personal space as well as in a public/inter-relational one and the negotiation between those two. A concern that underpins much of her work. These c prints are a selection of images from the balls series.

NaCl studies/Sodium chloride

2012

NaCL studies/Sodium chloride is series of studies and diagrammatic drawings that explore the process of formation of salt’ crystals from chloride atoms using an optical microscope and sem technology (electron microscope technology). Salt is a recurrent material in Emanuele’s practice, an ubiquitous material with an universal taste used in most culture. One of the properties of salt is its capacity to   repeatedly transform, dissolving and crystallising is an ongoing process. Nacl Studies is a series of studies developed during a residency at the conservation and restoration centre La Venaria Reale, in collaboration with the department of physic of the University of Turin. The project aimed to extend ongoing concerns of Emanuele’s art practice such as material transformation, time and temporality by engaging with scientific processes, facilities and technologies for artistic production.The focus was on developing strategies for making the invisible visible through an exploration of material processes.

 

Dotty mask

2015

Originally realised for WhiteNoise, Dotty Mask is a film that shows a slow, repetitive and lived-through experiential gesture in which one by one Emanuele plucks off adhesive coloured stationary dots from her face. ‘The performance of Emanuele drawing dots away from skin reveals the origin of the sign, the image within which meaning for us begins and remains circumscribed: the human face. The space of the face to be precise: the living pictogram, which signals the relation between its parts as a lived-through experience, yet whose singular history is continually connected with every glance to the varied history of others’ (extract from Whitenoise Joe Graham Text)

Brine buckets

2010

Brine buckets is a video installation created for Articulating Change Emanuele solo show at StoneSquid in Hastings. Projected onto a watery and salty surface the videos action one & two float inside the two metal buckets. The projected surface having the consistence of dried out sea water at time reveals other conceals the projection, whilst a salty surface is displayed above the buckets.

Post-it notes dance

2015

Originally realised for WhiteNoise, Post-it notes dance is Emanuele’s inventive response to the use of stationary material during her collaborative residency. The capacity to activate materials in innovative and performative ways is apparent throughout Emanuele’s practice, in WhiteNoise the material migrates into a performative gesture. The post-it notes become the Post-it notes dance, a piece where Emanuele obsessively attempts to free herself from their stickiness; a powerful metaphorical gesture that resonates with meaningful associations.

 

action one & two

push & pull

2009

The site-specific video installation action one & two created for the exhibition Uncharted Stories at the Triangle Space at Chelsea College of Art, responded to the space by using the narrowest corners of the gallery to create a mirroring projection of two actions performed for the camera. Action one represents a macro-vision of a transparent and jelly material that looks like a micro-world of cellule-like forms, attempting to pull each other apart; action two shows a female subject blowing to exhaustion into the same type of material, the more she blows the more she distorts the reflection of herself. Looking in and looking out, action one & two negotiate a space between the self and the world around.

Sweeping actions no #1

2017

Framing as choreographic moments, the sweeping and walking actions of the cleaning and security staff inside the Heydar Aliyev Centre by Zaha Hadid – such an extraordinary space in an incongruous place –  Sweeping Actions no #1 juxtaposes the timeless gleaming white hallways and floors of the space with the slow, repetitive and uninspired movements of the working staff that seemingly aimlessly, walk back and forth across the building during opening hours. Defining their walks as lines in space, Emanuele channels these movements as if there was a stage they were rising on.

Sweeping Actions no #1 has been made after a residency at Yarat Contemporary Art Space in Baku, Azerbaijan in 2014; it has been included in A History of Drawing, an exhibition at Camberwell Space that charts the history of teaching and making of drawing at Camberwell College of Arts curated by Kelly Chorpening.